How many times have you overheard someone talking about something you are knowledgable about and they don’t have a clue about what they are talking about?  It happened to me last weekend.  I was watching my wife’s daughter playing in a soccer game.  In front of me, was a group of three people.  One person was going on and on about what a chiropractor can and can’t help people with. Now, let me be clear, I’m not a chiropractor.  One of my best friends is however and I am fully aware of the range of his practice.

This all started when the person talking (the talker) had mentioned that she had taken her daughter to a chiropractor.  Her friend then said she was thinking about taking her daughter in for a condition she had.  The “talker”, who had no idea of what she was talking about, started telling her that chiropractors can’t fix or help with that condition.   Which is ridiculous, because my friend fixed the same condition in me.  So what should the talker have done differently?  She should have said, “I don’t know if a chiropractor can help with that.”, “I’m no expert but if I had to guess I’d say they can’t help with that.”, or “I have no idea if they can, but this is how my daughter made out with her visit.”. By acting like an expert, the “talker” basically convinced her friend not to take her daughter to a person that could have helped her.  Who knows how long it will take before her condition is better now.  It has been my experience that people who truly know what they are talking about don’t go around talking about it and the people who don’t know what they are talking about, talk about it all the time.

So, if you have no idea what you are talking about, do everyone a favor and remain silent.  I’m silent all the time (well most of the time).

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Written by Sean Pearson

Throughout his career, in an effort to become a truly well-rounded martial artist in both practice and philosophy, Master Pearson has studied a wide variety of martial arts: Taekwondo, Kali, Kyudo, Iaido, Aikido, Judo, Jodo, Bando and Tai Chi. He holds dan rankings in six of these arts and master ranks in three of them. To this same end he has studied and achieved national recognition as a wilderness survival instructor, a certified hypnotherapist, and a lecturer in Neuro Linguistic Psychology.

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